Nicotine and pregnant smokers:

Time: 13:25 - 13:40

Date: Wednesday 8th December 2021

One of the controversies surrounding e-cigarettes (EC) is their use by pregnant smokers. Animal studies have demonstrated that nicotine on its own can damage pregnancy, but such studies typically use very large nicotine doses.  It is not clear to what extent doses used by human nicotine users affect pregnancy outcomes. The risk is considered much less than risks of smoking and nicotine patches are widely used to help pregnant smokers quit. Data from such use indicate the same or even better pregnancy outcomes in women using nicotine patches (NRT) compared to placebo, but NRT has only limited efficacy in pregnant smokers. E-cigarettes (EC) may represent a more effective option, but their safety and efficacy in pregnancy need checking. The presentation will review effects of nicotine on its own, without combustion chemicals from tobacco smoke, on pregnancy outcomes and consider the potential of EC to help pregnant smokers reduce or quit smoking.    

Speaker

  • Prof Peter Hajek Professor of Clinical Psychology - Wolfson Institute of Public Health, Queen Mary University of London

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